An Old Reader Reader Testifies

Recently, we asked you to drop an email to [email protected] telling us a little about why you use RSS, how long you’ve been using the Old Reader, and 5 feeds that you think other people in our community will love. We’ve gotten a ton of great feedback, and as promised, here’s one of our readers, talking about how the Old Reader fits her life. So, without any more windup, here is Lindsey Hoffman, who blogs at http://foreverarriving.blogspot.com/ and explains why the Old Reader is important to her.Back in the early days of the blogosphere,  I used to maintain a bookmarked list of blogs and webcomics to click on every week. As a librarian and an insatiably curious human, I found far more sites of interest than I could keep track of this way. RSS came to my rescue, first in the form of Bloglines (probably around 2004), then Google Reader. The collapse of GReader was the end of an era for me, and I still miss the camaraderie I found there. But after carefully examining my options, I concluded The Old Reader did the best job of replacing the functionality I had come to rely on, and I’m still very happy with it.RSS gives me information in a way that is easy to manage and personalize. Where social media like Facebook and Tumblr provide an endless chaotic flow of input of dubious validity, RSS allows me to curate my reading around things that matter to me, and organize it in such a way that I can go directly to serious matter or fun fluff, depending on what I have energy for. The Old Reader makes this organization easy, and I find it pairs nicely with Instapaper when I want to read a long article in a friendlier font.I’m no longer a librarian, but I’m still insatiably curious. I use RSS to keep up with blogs and Tumblrs of friends far and near, tech news, Etsy shops, music, FDA recalls, authors I admire, PostSecret, social justice issues, and doings in my former home of Portland, Oregon… and a lot more. Anytime I want to learn more about something – tiny houses, intentional communities, healthy cooking, Ubuntu Linux, the perspectives of people different from myself – I find myself a blog or two, plug it into The Old Reader, and get informed at a pace that works for me.Not everyone experiences the internet in the same way. For me, it’s all about the words, about finding and sharing ideas through good writing. If you’re a word person too, here are five feeds you might enjoy:Prague Race - http://www.praguerace.com/A beautifully drawn, wonderfully strange Finnish fantasy webcomic by Petra Erika Nordlund.ADD FEEDSaid the Gramophone - http://www.saidthegramophone.com/An old-skool MP3blog from 2003, StG offers MP3s of diverse genres, along with writing inspired by the music. I came for the free music and stayed for the writing, which inspires me to think about and experience music in different ways.ADD FEEDProject 562 Blog - http://www.matikawilbur.com/blog/Matika Wilbur, a photographer of Swinomish and Tulalip heritage, is documenting all 562 Native tribes of the United States. Her interviews, articles, photos, and video provide a glimpse into the pride, beauty, struggles, and vision of this often-stereotyped population.ADD FEEDIdle Words - http://www.idlewords.com/Maciej Cegłowski (founder of Pinboard.in) travels around the world having amazing adventures and misadventures. Occasionally, he posts very long essays about his experiences, which are always packed with fascinating facts, dry wit, and a little whining. I usually start them thinking “I can’t believe how long this is,” and finish them thinking “Wow, I’m so glad I read that!”ADD FEEDUrsula K. Le Guin: New on the Website - http://ursulakleguin.com/We are lucky to have sci-fi and fantasy author Ursula Le Guin still among us. This venerable Portlander still blogs intermittently, though her posts are fewer these days due to health issues. Her site is managed by someone else, and the mechanics of its feed are a little wonky and indirect, but it’s worth it to get updates on and from this literary legend.ADD FEED

An Old Reader Reader Testifies

image

Recently, we asked you to drop an email to [email protected] telling us a little about why you use RSS, how long you’ve been using the Old Reader, and 5 feeds that you think other people in our community will love. We’ve gotten a ton of great feedback, and as promised, here’s one of our readers, talking about how the Old Reader fits her life. So, without any more windup, here is Lindsey Hoffman, who blogs at http://foreverarriving.blogspot.com/ and explains why the Old Reader is important to her.

Back in the early days of the blogosphere,  I used to maintain a bookmarked list of blogs and webcomics to click on every week. As a librarian and an insatiably curious human, I found far more sites of interest than I could keep track of this way. RSS came to my rescue, first in the form of Bloglines (probably around 2004), then Google Reader. The collapse of GReader was the end of an era for me, and I still miss the camaraderie I found there. But after carefully examining my options, I concluded The Old Reader did the best job of replacing the functionality I had come to rely on, and I’m still very happy with it.

RSS gives me information in a way that is easy to manage and personalize. Where social media like Facebook and Tumblr provide an endless chaotic flow of input of dubious validity, RSS allows me to curate my reading around things that matter to me, and organize it in such a way that I can go directly to serious matter or fun fluff, depending on what I have energy for. The Old Reader makes this organization easy, and I find it pairs nicely with Instapaper when I want to read a long article in a friendlier font.

I’m no longer a librarian, but I’m still insatiably curious. I use RSS to keep up with blogs and Tumblrs of friends far and near, tech news, Etsy shops, music, FDA recalls, authors I admire, PostSecret, social justice issues, and doings in my former home of Portland, Oregon… and a lot more. Anytime I want to learn more about something – tiny houses, intentional communities, healthy cooking, Ubuntu Linux, the perspectives of people different from myself – I find myself a blog or two, plug it into The Old Reader, and get informed at a pace that works for me.

Not everyone experiences the internet in the same way. For me, it’s all about the words, about finding and sharing ideas through good writing. If you’re a word person too, here are five feeds you might enjoy:

image

Prague Race - http://www.praguerace.com/
A beautifully drawn, wonderfully strange Finnish fantasy webcomic by Petra Erika Nordlund.

ADD FEED

image

Said the Gramophone - http://www.saidthegramophone.com/
An old-skool MP3blog from 2003, StG offers MP3s of diverse genres, along with writing inspired by the music. I came for the free music and stayed for the writing, which inspires me to think about and experience music in different ways.

ADD FEED

image

Project 562 Blog - http://www.matikawilbur.com/blog/
Matika Wilbur, a photographer of Swinomish and Tulalip heritage, is documenting all 562 Native tribes of the United States. Her interviews, articles, photos, and video provide a glimpse into the pride, beauty, struggles, and vision of this often-stereotyped population.

ADD FEED

image

Idle Words - http://www.idlewords.com/
Maciej Cegłowski (founder of Pinboard.in) travels around the world having amazing adventures and misadventures. Occasionally, he posts very long essays about his experiences, which are always packed with fascinating facts, dry wit, and a little whining. I usually start them thinking “I can’t believe how long this is,” and finish them thinking “Wow, I’m so glad I read that!”

ADD FEED

image

Ursula K. Le Guin: New on the Website - http://ursulakleguin.com/
We are lucky to have sci-fi and fantasy author Ursula Le Guin still among us. This venerable Portlander still blogs intermittently, though her posts are fewer these days due to health issues. Her site is managed by someone else, and the mechanics of its feed are a little wonky and indirect, but it’s worth it to get updates on and from this literary legend.

ADD FEED