Godin: The candy diet

I enjoyed Godin’s post today very much.  He talks about how our collective decision to go for the quick and easy hit of media (or candy) via clickbait articles, videos, and other junk food media is killing off the essential service of journalism.  “Read the short articles, the ones with pictures, it’s simpler than digging deep.Clickbait works for a reason. Because people click on it.”And:“The media has always bounced between pandering to make a buck and upping the intellectual ante of what they present. Now that this balance has been ceded to an algorithm, we’re on the edge of a breakneck race to the bottom, with no brakes and no break in sight.”But he also talks plenty about how quickly this could all change:“Even if only a few people use precise words, employ thoughtful reasoning and ask difficult questions, it still forces those around them to catch up. It’s easy to imagine a slippery slope down, but there’s also the cultural ratchet, a positive function in which people race to learn more and understand more so they can keep up with those around them.”So, Happy New Years everybody.  Let’s get people to join us in asking difficult questions.  Choosing the long read and choosing to be informed.  Let’s ask friends to join us on The Old Reader or another non-biased platform where we can share good ideas and keep our minds nourished.

Godin: The candy diet

I enjoyed Godin’s post today very much.  He talks about how our collective decision to go for the quick and easy hit of media (or candy) via clickbait articles, videos, and other junk food media is killing off the essential service of journalism.  

“Read the short articles, the ones with pictures, it’s simpler than digging deep.Clickbait works for a reason. Because people click on it.”

And:

“The media has always bounced between pandering to make a buck and upping the intellectual ante of what they present. Now that this balance has been ceded to an algorithm, we’re on the edge of a breakneck race to the bottom, with no brakes and no break in sight.”

But he also talks plenty about how quickly this could all change:

“Even if only a few people use precise words, employ thoughtful reasoning and ask difficult questions, it still forces those around them to catch up. It’s easy to imagine a slippery slope down, but there’s also the cultural ratchet, a positive function in which people race to learn more and understand more so they can keep up with those around them.”

So, Happy New Years everybody.  Let’s get people to join us in asking difficult questions.  Choosing the long read and choosing to be informed.  Let’s ask friends to join us on The Old Reader or another non-biased platform where we can share good ideas and keep our minds nourished.